Losing my dad.

And the responsibilities of not having one.

Yesterday my dad would’ve turned 61. It’s been 6 years since he passed away but it never really got easier. It’s a tough reality to accept. The only thing that is supposed to make you feel better is the idea that he’s in a better place now and that he’s watching over you and although that suffices some odd emotional bs emptiness inside, I would much rather have him here in person. But that’s not possible anymore. I lost him when I was a senior in high school. At the age of 17, nothing was ever absolute in my life. Whenever there were unforeseen situations that popped up, my dad always found a way to fix it. He was the living proof that when there is a will there is a way. No problem was ever too big to solve. No mountain was ever too tall to climb. He was our family’s Superman and the epitome of the immigrant dream...

Life after.

Coasting back to recovery by doing unscalable things

It’s been over a year since we sold our startup and it’s been an interesting time returning back to normal life. Whether it was the chaotic fun of running a team or the fact that we were the sole dictators of our fate, I definitely miss it — and at the same time, glad it is a chapter closed.

Not many people talk about it but running a company gets pretty lonely. The feeling of guilt followed me on the daily. The idea that every individual’s fate on the team was dependent on the decisions I made was something that ate at me constantly. Being a founder comes with the expectation of being the leader that steers the rest of the cohort to success. There’s a degree of accountability of a founder to be able to produce results which include monetary results for their team. When there is a question, there is an expectation that you will have or do your job to get the right answer. When there is a problem, the requirement of a leader is that you will be the one with the best solution. You’re the one who is expected to align everyone from the chaos and direct everyone with the vision — regardless if you’re ready...

In an attempt to change the world, we lose ourselves.

Balancing excitement and discontentment in the modern world

I believe that the desire and urgency to make an impact is something we all have on our to-do list. We like the idea of building something useful and utilized by the vast majority. We dream of the possibility of one day stumbling upon something that propels into something greater. While we accept that we are only temporary beings and not immortal, we like the idea of being part of building something bigger than ourselves — with hopes that it’ll live on even after us. And it is the very idea of changing the world that both emboldens us to act and also kills us with discontent. In an attempt to change the world, we lose ourselves...

Missing home.

The untold cost of being away from family

I try to have daily calls with my mom for the last 6 years I’ve been away from home. I just got off the phone with her and we teared up a bit in the end. I’m in San Francisco and she’s back home in Canada. We often forget that when we choose to migrate to different parts of the world for better opportunities, we also sacrifice the time we get to spend with our loved ones. It seems like that’s just a part of the deal — but it’s a deal that we sign and our loved ones just have to go along with...

The Overwhelming Guilt

What they didn't tell me about starting a startup

Before I started this whole thing, they told me:

· 'It's going to be tough'
· 'You're fighting an uphill battle'
· 'You're probably going to fail'
· 'You're going to have to bootstrap everything'
· 'You're going to be financially screwed, sacrifice family time, and have sleepless nights'

Those are all true and I have somewhat experienced a bit of everything but that wasn't it. There are a few things that I didn't expect to be facing (which I assume is normal) that made me embark on writing this blog post...

5 tips that helped me grow this year.

Taking a step back and reflecting

It’s been a while since I’ve gotten the chance to sit down and whole-heartedly reflect on life. So to start, I want to say that I’ve learned a lot these past few months — about myself and different perspectives. Here they are:

1. Treat everyone as if they were the smartest person you’ve ever met.

My friend mentioned that to me (probably when we were eating instant noodles at 4 am in the morning) and it really got me thinking. If we took away our macho egos and view everyone as our teachers, we will not only instil positive vibes into people but...